Purpose

This study will assess whether an intervention including mindfulness, dietary education, and smoking cessation can help African-American women of childbearing age (age 18-44) with hypertension or high blood pressure to lower their blood pressure. The investigators propose to screen women of childbearing age for hypertension, and to invite women to participate in an intervention to reduce their blood pressure. The investigators will track their perceived stress and their blood pressure levels over the next 6 months. Half of the women who participate will be given a blood pressure cuff and taught to measure their own blood pressure. More frequent tracking of blood pressure will be done in these women.

Condition

Eligibility

Eligible Ages
Between 18 Years and 44 Years
Eligible Genders
Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
No

Inclusion Criteria

  • Hypertension
  • Age 18-44
  • African-American
  • Female

Exclusion Criteria

  • Male
  • Age <18 or >44
  • Non-African American
  • Not female
  • Pregnant

Study Design

Phase
N/A
Study Type
Interventional
Allocation
Non-Randomized
Intervention Model
Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description
Two groups will both participate in the 7-part educational series to reduce high blood pressure. One of the two groups will also be given a blood pressure cuff and will be trained to check their own blood pressure. We will track blood pressure and stress level of both groups for 6 months
Primary Purpose
Treatment
Masking
None (Open Label)

Arm Groups

ArmDescriptionAssigned Intervention
Active Comparator
Education, BP cuff & training
High blood pressure management education. Home blood pressure measurement
  • Behavioral: High blood pressure management education
    The 7-part education series includes 5 sessions focused on mindfulness and breathing techniques for stress reduction. One session will focus on choosing healthy, low salt foods and will provide resources for smoking cessation. The final session will include a grocery store tour to teach participants how to read food labels and to purchase healthy food.
  • Behavioral: Home blood pressure measurement
    Participants will be taught to use an automated blood pressure cuff and will be asked to provide monthly blood pressure readings to study staff.
Active Comparator
Education only
High blood pressure management education
  • Behavioral: High blood pressure management education
    The 7-part education series includes 5 sessions focused on mindfulness and breathing techniques for stress reduction. One session will focus on choosing healthy, low salt foods and will provide resources for smoking cessation. The final session will include a grocery store tour to teach participants how to read food labels and to purchase healthy food.

Recruiting Locations

Furman L. Templeton Preparatory Academy
Baltimore, Maryland 21217
Contact:
Layotis Mackey
latoria.mackey@ssw.umaryland.edu

More Details

NCT ID
NCT03741608
Status
Recruiting
Sponsor
University of Maryland, College Park

Study Contact

Wendy G Lane, MD, MPH
4107067865
wlane@som.umaryland.edu

Detailed Description

Chronic and pregnancy-associated hypertension increase risk for poor birth outcomes, including higher rates of low birthweight and preterm birth. Mindfulness interventions, dietary education, and smoking cessation education have all been effectively employed to reduce hypertension, but have infrequently targeted women of childbearing age in community settings. This study will screen African-American women of childbearing age for hypertension, and invite women with hypertension to participate in a seven-session intervention to reduce blood pressure. The investigators will track their perceived stress and their blood pressure levels over the next 6 months. Half of the women who participate will be given a blood pressure cuff and taught to measure their own blood pressure. More frequent tracking of blood pressure will be done in these women.

Notice

Study information shown on this site is derived from ClinicalTrials.gov (a public registry operated by the National Institutes of Health). The listing of studies provided is not certain to be all studies for which you might be eligible. Furthermore, study eligibility requirements can be difficult to understand and may change over time, so it is wise to speak with your medical care provider and individual research study teams when making decisions related to participation.