Purpose

Aging is associated with a loss of muscle mass, termed sarcopenia, that reduces mobility, decreases physical function and accelerates progression of other age-related disorders. This study is designed to determine whether increasing skeletal muscle capillarization through aerobic exercise will enhance muscular adaptations to strength training in older adults with sarcopenia.

Condition

Eligibility

Eligible Ages
Between 70 Years and 88 Years
Eligible Genders
All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
Yes

Inclusion Criteria

  • Body Mass Index = 18-29.9 kg/m2
  • Non-smoker
  • Presence of at least moderate sarcopenia (low muscle mass per unit body height)

Exclusion Criteria

  • Diagnosis of diabetes, cancer, pulmonary or renal disease
  • Physical impairment preventing exercise
  • Recent history of exercise training

Study Design

Phase
N/A
Study Type
Interventional
Allocation
Randomized
Intervention Model
Crossover Assignment
Intervention Model Description
The study employs 2 interventions: resistance training and aerobic exercise training. One group of participants will undergo resistance training then aerobic exercise training; the other group will undergo aerobic exercise training then resistance training.
Primary Purpose
Treatment
Masking
Single (Outcomes Assessor)

Arm Groups

ArmDescriptionAssigned Intervention
Experimental
Aerobic exercise training followed by resistance training
Participants in this arm will undergo 3 months of aerobic exercise training, followed by 3 months of strength training
  • Other: Aerobic exercise training
    3 months of center-based, supervised treadmill exercise
  • Other: Strength training
    3 months of center-based, supervise strength training
Active Comparator
Resistance training followed by aerobic exercise training
Participants in this arm will undergo 3 months of strength training, followed by 3 months of aerobic exercise training
  • Other: Aerobic exercise training
    3 months of center-based, supervised treadmill exercise
  • Other: Strength training
    3 months of center-based, supervise strength training

Recruiting Locations

University of Maryland, Baltimore & Baltimore VA Medical Center
Baltimore, Maryland 21201
Contact:
Eric Christensen, M.S.
410-605-7000
echristensen@som.umaryland.edu

More Details

Status
Recruiting
Sponsor
Baltimore VA Medical Center

Study Contact

Steven J Prior, PhD
301-405-2483
sprior@umd.edu

Detailed Description

Sarcopenia, or the aging-related loss of muscle mass, affects a large number of older adults. The presence of sarcopenia is associated with physical disability, poor quality of life, and all-cause mortality, in part because sarcopenic adults have low muscle skeletal muscle capillarization and may lack the adequate perfusion needed to maintain muscle mass and function. This study will test the effects of increasing skeletal muscle capillarization through aerobic exercise training on responses to resistance training in older adults. Eligible participants will be randomized to one of two groups, resistance training preceded by aerobic exercise training (AEX-RT), or resistance training followed by aerobic exercise training (RT-AEX). Participants in the AEX-RT group will undergo 3 months of aerobic exercise training to increase skeletal muscle capillarization, followed by 3 months of resistance training. Participants in the RT-AEX group will undergo 3 months of resistance training, followed by 3 months of aerobic exercise training. Before and after the interventions, participants will undergo assessments of muscle size, strength, and capillarization, as well as assessments of physical function.

Notice

Study information shown on this site is derived from ClinicalTrials.gov (a public registry operated by the National Institutes of Health). The listing of studies provided is not certain to be all studies for which you might be eligible. Furthermore, study eligibility requirements can be difficult to understand and may change over time, so it is wise to speak with your medical care provider and individual research study teams when making decisions related to participation.