108 matching studies

Sponsor Condition of Interest
A Study of Rucaparib in Patients With Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer and Homologous...
Clovis Oncology, Inc. Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer
The purpose of this study is to determine how patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, and evidence of a homologous recombination gene deficiency, respond to treatment with rucaparib. expand

The purpose of this study is to determine how patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, and evidence of a homologous recombination gene deficiency, respond to treatment with rucaparib.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Feb 2017

open study

Wellness Champions for Change
University of Maryland, Baltimore Obesity, Childhood
The Wellness Champions for Change (WCC) study aims to reduce pediatric obesity among students who attend schools in Maryland by training teacher and student-led wellness teams to increase opportunities for physical activity and healthy eating at school. The study uses a cluster... expand

The Wellness Champions for Change (WCC) study aims to reduce pediatric obesity among students who attend schools in Maryland by training teacher and student-led wellness teams to increase opportunities for physical activity and healthy eating at school. The study uses a cluster randomized design to allocate 6 schools (3 elementary, 3 middle) in 5 school systems to one of 3 arms: "A" (teacher and student training), "B" (teacher training only), and "C") (delayed teacher training/control). Approximately 36 3rd/6th graders and their caregivers ("evaluation cohort"), 15 4th/7th graders ("student leaders"), and 20 teachers from each school will be recruited in the spring before the intervention. All schools will identify a teacher "Wellness Champion" who will coordinate intervention activities. In "A" and "B" schools, wellness champions will attend a training to learn how to build a wellness team and create more opportunities for students to make healthy choices. In "A" schools, student leaders ("Student Wellness Champions") will meet weekly during lunch with a health educator to receive training as peer leaders and help the Wellness Champion with wellness initiatives. Student leaders in "B" and "C" schools will receive a monthly general Adolescent Health Curriculum. To assess the impact of the teacher and student-led interventions, the evaluation cohort will be followed for 2.5 years, with measures including: anthropometry (height/weight), 7-day accelerometry (physical activity), and validated questionnaires to assess healthy eating. Student leaders will be followed for 1.5 years to assess the impact of their participation, with measures including: anthropometry, 7-day accelerometry, validated questionnaires to assess healthy eating, and validated questionnaires and focus groups to assess leadership/advocacy skills. Teachers will complete validated questionnaires to investigate their perceptions of the school environment, classroom practices, and role modeling skills. Prior to data collection and analysis, participants will be assigned an identification number, and all documents linking participant information to identification numbers will be locked/ password-protected.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: May 2017

open study

Meningeal Inflammation on 7T MRI as a Tool for Measuring and Predicting Ocrelizumab Response in Multiple...
University of Maryland, Baltimore Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system. In MS, inflammation is known to attack areas of the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves; resulting in disability. Current MRI technology provides an adequate view of the impact of MS on the "white... expand

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system. In MS, inflammation is known to attack areas of the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves; resulting in disability. Current MRI technology provides an adequate view of the impact of MS on the "white matter" of the brain, which contains many of the connections between neurons. Quantification of lesions in the white matter due to MS are a standard part of clinical trials and clinical care in MS. However, it has long been known that MS not only can affect the white matter, but also the "gray matter," which contains the majority of the nerve cells in the brain and can cause inflammation in the meninges (the protective tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord). Autopsy studies have shown that the inflammation seen in the meninges is driven by a B-cells, a subset of white blood cells and that meningeal inflammation may be responsible for damage to the gray matter of the brain. Ocrelizumab is a new treatment for multiple sclerosis. This medication works by targeting and destroying circulating B-cells. It is thought that this may reduce the level of meningeal inflammation in patients with multiple sclerosis. By reducing meningeal inflammation, this medication may result in less damage to the gray matter and subsequently less disability in MS patients. In this study, the investigators will evaluate the use of a method on 7 tesla (7T) MRI to identify inflammation in the meninges as a potential predictor of response to ocrelizumab treatment for multiple sclerosis. Further, the investigators will evaluate if this MRI technique can be used to monitor the long-term effect of the medication on meningeal inflammation and the development of damage to the gray matter of the brain.

Type: Observational

Start Date: Sep 2018

open study

Hypoglycemia Associated Autonomic Failure in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM)
University of Maryland, Baltimore Type 1 Diabetes Hypoglycemia Associated Autonomic Failure
Exercise is a cornerstone of diabetes management. It helps reduce blood pressure, promote weight loss, lower insulin resistance and improve glucose and lipid (triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol) profiles. Unfortunately, the benefits of exercise are often not embraced by diabetic... expand

Exercise is a cornerstone of diabetes management. It helps reduce blood pressure, promote weight loss, lower insulin resistance and improve glucose and lipid (triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol) profiles. Unfortunately, the benefits of exercise are often not embraced by diabetic individuals because of the fear of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). My laboratory has demonstrated that Autonomic nervous system (ANS) counterregulatory failure plays an important role in exercise associated hypoglycemia in Type 1 DM. ANS responses are significantly reduced in Type 1 DM and are further blunted by antecedent episodes of hypoglycemia. Furthermore, there is a large sexual dimorphism of reduced ANS responses during submaximal exercise in both Type 1 DM and healthy individuals that is unexplained. Accumulating data are demonstrating that serotonergic pathways can regulate ANS discharge. Generally, serotonergic pathways are inhibitory but both single and longer term administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's) such as Prozac has been demonstrated to increase basal epinephrine levels and enhance baroreflex control of Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. What is unknown is whether fluoxetine can also enhance SNS responses and also override the large ANS sexual dimorphism present during sub maximal exercise. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine if the SSRI fluoxetine (Prozac) can improve SNS responses during exercise.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Oct 2012

open study

Differing Levels of Hypoglycemia
University of Maryland, Baltimore Hypoglycemia
Hypoglycemia can produce a spectrum of pro-inflammatory and pro-atherothrombotic changes. To date no studies appear to have investigated the effects of differing levels of hypoglycemia on the vasculature and pro-atherothrombotic balance during hypoglycemia in healthy man. The... expand

Hypoglycemia can produce a spectrum of pro-inflammatory and pro-atherothrombotic changes. To date no studies appear to have investigated the effects of differing levels of hypoglycemia on the vasculature and pro-atherothrombotic balance during hypoglycemia in healthy man. The specific aim of our study will be to determine the effects of differing levels of hypoglycemia on in-vivo vascular biologic mechanisms in a healthy population.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Jul 2015

open study

Pharmacogenetic Treatment With Anti-Glutaminergic Agents for Comorbid PTSD & AUD
University of Maryland, Baltimore PTSD Alcohol Use Disorder
The primary study objective is to determine the efficacy of pregabalin administered orally for a period of 12 weeks in reducing risky drinking and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder who have selected genotypes at the gamma-amino butyric acid transporter and receptor genes.... expand

The primary study objective is to determine the efficacy of pregabalin administered orally for a period of 12 weeks in reducing risky drinking and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder who have selected genotypes at the gamma-amino butyric acid transporter and receptor genes. The secondary objective is to assess the safety and tolerability of pregabalin in participants with alcohol use disorder and co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder who have selected genotypes at the gamma-amino butyric acid transporter and receptor genes. The investigators will utilize a large and diverse sample of African-Americans that includes both genders and individuals with different types of trauma. All participants will receive standardized bi-weekly Brief Behavioral Compliance Enhancement Treatment (BBCET).

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Sep 2016

open study

Dose Response of Epinephrine
University of Maryland, Baltimore Diabetes Complications
Epinephrine is the principal physiologic defense against hypoglycemia in type 1 and longer duration type 2 DM. Despite this, it is unknown how epinephrine regulates in-vivo endothelial function and atherothrombotic balance in humans. The specific aim of our study will be to determine... expand

Epinephrine is the principal physiologic defense against hypoglycemia in type 1 and longer duration type 2 DM. Despite this, it is unknown how epinephrine regulates in-vivo endothelial function and atherothrombotic balance in humans. The specific aim of our study will be to determine the dose response effects of the key ANS counterregulatory hormone epinephrine on endothelial function, fibrinolytic balance and pro-atherogenic inflammatory mechanisms in healthy humans.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Jun 2016

open study

Hip Muscle Power, Lateral Balance Function, and Falls in Aging
University of Maryland, Baltimore Accidental Falls
Falls and their consequences are among the major problems in the medical care of older individuals. The long-term goal of this research is to develop a mechanistically based therapeutic intervention to enhance muscle power, weight-shifting capability, and lateral balance function... expand

Falls and their consequences are among the major problems in the medical care of older individuals. The long-term goal of this research is to develop a mechanistically based therapeutic intervention to enhance muscle power, weight-shifting capability, and lateral balance function through protective stepping to prevent falls. When human balance is challenged, protective stepping is a vital strategy for preventing a fall during activities of daily life. Many older people at risk for falls have particular difficulties with successfully stepping sideways as a protective response to loss of balance in the lateral direction. Age-related declines in lateral balance function result from neuromuscular and biomechanical limitations in hip abductor-adductor muscle power generation. This study will test whether these impairments can be improved with high-velocity hip muscle resistance power training that will be more effective than conventional resistance strength training.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Sep 2019

open study

Salivary Glycated Albumin
University of Maryland, Baltimore Diabetes Mellitus
(1) to determine whether the ratio of glycated albumin and total albumin in saliva is equivalent to blood and (2) to investigate whether the non-invasive SmartAlbu portable salivary sensor is as accurate as standard tests that measure glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). expand

(1) to determine whether the ratio of glycated albumin and total albumin in saliva is equivalent to blood and (2) to investigate whether the non-invasive SmartAlbu portable salivary sensor is as accurate as standard tests that measure glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c).

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Aug 2017

open study

Neuromuscular and Biomechanical Control of Lower Limb Loading in Individuals With Chronic Stroke
University of Maryland, Baltimore Stroke Hemiparesis
Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the U.S. Individuals with hemiparesis due to stroke often have difficulty bearing weight on their legs and transferring weight from one leg to the other. The ability to bear weight on the legs is important during functional... expand

Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the U.S. Individuals with hemiparesis due to stroke often have difficulty bearing weight on their legs and transferring weight from one leg to the other. The ability to bear weight on the legs is important during functional movements such as rising from a chair, standing and walking. Diminished weight transfer contributes to asymmetries during walking which commonly leads to greater energy expenditure. Moreover, deficits in bearing weight on the paretic leg contribute to lateral instability and are associated with decreased walking speed and increased risk of falling in individuals post-stroke. These functional limitations affect community participation and life quality. Thus, restoring the ability to bear weight on the legs, i.e., limb loading, is a critical goal for rehabilitation post-stroke. The purpose of this research is to identify the impairments in neuromechanical mechanisms of limb loading and determine whether limb loading responses can be retrained by induced forced limb loading.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Feb 2019

open study

PKD Clinical and Translational Core Study
University of Maryland, Baltimore Polycystic Kidney Disease
Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) have opened up possibilities of new therapies to prevent disease progression. High quality clinical investigations in patients with ADPKD, however, pose significant challenges... expand

Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) have opened up possibilities of new therapies to prevent disease progression. High quality clinical investigations in patients with ADPKD, however, pose significant challenges to investigators including limited access to patients with ADPKD,insufficient guidance by experienced investigators and lack of resources to conduct these studies. The Polycystic Kidney Disease Research Clinical and Translational Core (P30) aims to establish an infrastructure that will assist investigators in designing and conducting highest quality clinical and translational research focused on a diverse group of patients with ADPKD. Objective 1: To establish a Mid-Atlantic cohort of ADPKD patients (N=200) with baseline clinical phenotyping performed at the General Clinical Research Unit of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Objective 2: To establish a state-of-the-art biobank of specimens from the ADPKD cohort including serum, plasma,urine and DNA. Objective 3: To develop a collaborative network of physicians and practices in the Mid-Atlantic region who will contribute to the ADPKD cohort and will be willing to refer patients for future studies and trials. Objective 4: To establish a web-based registry of ADPKD patients in the Mid-Atlantic area.

Type: Observational [Patient Registry]

Start Date: Mar 2013

open study

Biologic Mechanisms for Pain Variation After Physical Activity in Osteoarthritis
University of Maryland, Baltimore Osteoarthritis, Knee Pain Physical Activity Mitochondrial Pathology
Osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee is characterized by chronic inflammatory pain that is not necessarily related to the amount of joint damage. Clinical practice guidelines recommend physical activity (PA) for osteoarthritis pain, but most adults with OA do not engage in PA. One... expand

Osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee is characterized by chronic inflammatory pain that is not necessarily related to the amount of joint damage. Clinical practice guidelines recommend physical activity (PA) for osteoarthritis pain, but most adults with OA do not engage in PA. One reason for this is that while PA can reduce OA related joint pain, it does not work for everyone. PA decreases pain sensitivity for about half of adults with OA but increases pain sensitivity for the other half. The investigators are hypothesizing that individual differences in how well cells work to make energy, inflammation, and different proteins available in blood cells explains who PA will work to reduce pain and who it won't among adults with OA. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine if blood cells' ability to make cellular energy, inflammation and proteins help explain the difference about who PA reduces activity for and who it doesn't. The investigators will compare these biologic factors and pain sensitivity before walking, immediately after 30 minutes of walking (i.e. "acute") and after six weeks of walking three times a week for 30 minutes (i.e. "long-term") in adults with hip or knee osteoarthritis. The investigators will also compare these results to adults without OA. The investigators will recruit a sample of 40 adults with radiologic (e.g x-ray or CT scan) evidence of hip or knee OA and 20 age/gender matched healthy adults without OA to address the following study aims: Aim 1: To examine the effects of a six week (three days/week) walking program on pain in adults with OA as compared to healthy controls. Aim 2: To test the cells' ability to make energy as a mechanism for variation in pain after "acute" and "long-term" PA in older adults with lower extremity osteoarthritis. Aim3: To test the role of inflammation as a mechanism for variation in pain after "acute" and "long-term" physical activity in adults with lower extremity osteoarthritis. Aim 4: To generate hypotheses regarding the role of proteomics in variation in pain after "acute" and "long-term" physical activity.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: May 2018

open study

Dental Carotid Cognitive Study
University of Maryland, Baltimore Carotid Stenosis Mild Cognitive Impairment Periodontitis
Periodontal Disease (PD) is present in 60+% of adults >65 years and is associated with tobacco smoking, diabetes, and atherosclerosis that worsen inflammation, comorbidities common in older people with mild to moderate cognitive impairment (MCI). Older MCI patients are prone... expand

Periodontal Disease (PD) is present in 60+% of adults >65 years and is associated with tobacco smoking, diabetes, and atherosclerosis that worsen inflammation, comorbidities common in older people with mild to moderate cognitive impairment (MCI). Older MCI patients are prone to poor oral hygiene and dental health, which if untreated worsens inflammation-mediated brain and nervous system function, and accelerates progression to dementia. Asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS) is often a silent disease detected in only ~10% of older adults, and may have a strong association with MCI. This study examines the effects of intensive therapy for periodontitis on cognition in high-risk older people with ACAS. Results could highlight PD as a readily modifiable risk factor for dementia.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Apr 2019

open study

Use of a Rapid Turnaround Test for NG/CT to Improve Treatment of Women Presenting With Possible STIs
University of Maryland, Baltimore Sexually Transmitted Infection Gonorrhea Female Chlamydia Females
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of utilizing a rapid turnaround CT/NG test on treatment of female patients in the emergency department or urgent care setting with possible STIs. expand

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of utilizing a rapid turnaround CT/NG test on treatment of female patients in the emergency department or urgent care setting with possible STIs.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Sep 2018

open study

The Effects of Fluoxetine and/or DHEA
University of Maryland, Baltimore Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
(1) To determine how the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine (Prozac), an antidepressant often used to treat depression, stimulates the participant's body's ability to defend against low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). (2) To learn how a hormone, dehydroepiandrosterone... expand

(1) To determine how the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine (Prozac), an antidepressant often used to treat depression, stimulates the participant's body's ability to defend against low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). (2) To learn how a hormone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), stimulates the participant's body's ability to defend itself from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). DHEA is a hormone produced naturally in the human body. However, it can be manufactured and is sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement. The dose the investigators are giving in this study is higher than the usual recommended dosage taken as a supplement for certain medical conditions. (3) To study combined effects of fluoxetine and DHEA during low blood glucose. In the present study, the investigators will measure the participant's body's responses to hypoglycemia when given fluoxetine or DHEA or fluoxetine and DHEA or a placebo (a pill with no fluoxetine or DHEA). Approximately 64 individuals with type 1 diabetes will take part in this study.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Dec 2017

open study

Function Focused Care: Fracture Care at Home
University of Maryland, Baltimore Fractures, Bone Dementia
This pilot study will evaluate the feasibility of implementing an intervention in the home setting that is specifically designed to coach and mentor caregivers as they assist individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia (ADRD) who have fractured a hip to perform... expand

This pilot study will evaluate the feasibility of implementing an intervention in the home setting that is specifically designed to coach and mentor caregivers as they assist individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia (ADRD) who have fractured a hip to perform everyday activities and engage in more physical activity.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Sep 2018

open study

Progressive Rehabilitation Therapy in Patients With Advanced Lung Disease
University of Maryland, Baltimore Advanced Lung Disease Lung Transplant Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
The International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Registry data shows that there is a growing population of critically ill patients with advanced lung disease undergoing lung transplantation. The goal of our study is to evaluate the role of intensive physical therapy... expand

The International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Registry data shows that there is a growing population of critically ill patients with advanced lung disease undergoing lung transplantation. The goal of our study is to evaluate the role of intensive physical therapy for patients with advanced lung disease requiring transplant or ECMO(extracorporeal membrane oxygenation)- bridge to transplant with emphasis on the restoration of functional independence and prevention of functional declines after lung transplantation. The project is a designed as a randomized prospective research study investigating the impact of a multi-modal rehabilitation program(MRP), which incorporates neuromuscular electric stimulation(NMES), strength and mobility training, and nutritional supplementation(NS) in ameliorating the loss of muscle mass and strength, and lower extremity balance, strength and coordination that will decrease time on the ventilator or ECMO, stay in the ICU and hospital.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Jan 2019

open study

Circuitry-Guided Smoking Cessation in Schizophrenia
University of Maryland, Baltimore Smoking Cessation Nicotine Addiction Schizophrenia
In a double-blinded, randomized, parallel controlled design, patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder will be exposed to active or sham repetitive transcranial magentic stimulation (TMS) which was guided by functional magnetic resonance image (MRI). Smoking reduction/cessation... expand

In a double-blinded, randomized, parallel controlled design, patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder will be exposed to active or sham repetitive transcranial magentic stimulation (TMS) which was guided by functional magnetic resonance image (MRI). Smoking reduction/cessation and brain functional connectivity changes will be assessed at baseline, different stages of rTMS and/or follow-ups.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: May 2018

open study

Study of Probable Benefit of the Neuro-Spinal Scaffold™ in Subjects With Complete Thoracic AIS A Spinal...
InVivo Therapeutics Injury, Spinal Cord
This is a randomized, controlled, single-blind, multicenter, two Arm (Treatment or "Scaffold" Arm; Standard of Care or "Comparator" Arm) of a Neuro-Spinal Scaffold to evaluate whether the Scaffold is safe and demonstrates probable benefit for the treatment of complete T2-T12... expand

This is a randomized, controlled, single-blind, multicenter, two Arm (Treatment or "Scaffold" Arm; Standard of Care or "Comparator" Arm) of a Neuro-Spinal Scaffold to evaluate whether the Scaffold is safe and demonstrates probable benefit for the treatment of complete T2-T12 spinal cord injury as compared to standard of care open spine surgery.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: May 2019

open study

CVD 37000: Immunity and Microbiome Studies at Intestinal and Systemic Sites in Ty21a Vaccinated Adults
University of Maryland, Baltimore Typhoid Vaccination
This is an open-label, non-randomized study. The purpose of this study is to better understand how vaccines against typhoid fever affect the normal immune system and bacteria in the intestine. Patients having standard-of-care colonoscopies will be divided into 3 groups: Group... expand

This is an open-label, non-randomized study. The purpose of this study is to better understand how vaccines against typhoid fever affect the normal immune system and bacteria in the intestine. Patients having standard-of-care colonoscopies will be divided into 3 groups: Group 1: Vivotif typhoid vaccination then colonoscopy; Group 2: Colonoscopy, then Vivotif typhoid vaccination, then follow-up colonoscopy; Group 3: Colonoscopy without vaccination. The Vivotif typhoid vaccine used in this study is licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for travelers to developing countries. Volunteers will be asked to donate tissue, blood, saliva and stool samples for studying how the body responds to the typhoid vaccine.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Oct 2013

open study

Pilot RCT of Therapeutic Hypothermia Plus Neuromuscular Blockade in ARDS Patients
University of Maryland, Baltimore Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a serious condition that occurs as a complication of medical and surgical diseases, has a mortality of ~40%, and has no known treatment other than optimization of support. Data from basic research, animal models, and retrospective... expand

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a serious condition that occurs as a complication of medical and surgical diseases, has a mortality of ~40%, and has no known treatment other than optimization of support. Data from basic research, animal models, and retrospective studies, case series, and small prospective studies suggest that therapeutic hypothermia (TH) similar to that used for cardiac arrest may be lung protective in patients with ARDS; however, shivering and its metabolic impact is a major complication of TH, often requiring neuromuscular blockade (NMB) to control. Since the recently completed NHLBI PETAL ROSE trial showed that NMB caused conferred neither benefit nor harm in patients with moderate to severe ARDS, the investigators seek to bundle TH with NMB to reduce shivering. The investigators have completed an open label pilot study of TH+NMB in 8 ARDS patients that showed feasibility of the approach and improved clinical outcomes compared with historical controls who just received NMB. To test and refine protocols for recruitment and treatment prior to a large multisite Phase IIb RCT, the investigators are performing a small pilot single center RCT of TH (core temperature 34-35°C) + NMB for 48h vs. standard of care in patients with ARDS and P/F < 200. Primary outcome will be 28 day ventilator-free days and secondary outcomes will include physiologic measures, mortality, hospital and ICU length of stay, and serum biomarkers collected on days 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: May 2018

open study

Comparing Individualized vs. Weight Based Protocols to Treat VOE in SCD Occlusive Episodes in Sickle...
Duke University Sickle Cell Disease
The purpose of this research study is to compare two different ways to give opioid pain medicine to treat sickle cell disease pain that is bad enough to go to the emergency department for treatment. One way uses your weight to decide how much pain medicine to give you while in... expand

The purpose of this research study is to compare two different ways to give opioid pain medicine to treat sickle cell disease pain that is bad enough to go to the emergency department for treatment. One way uses your weight to decide how much pain medicine to give you while in the emergency department. This is called weight based treatment. The other way uses how much pain medicine you take at home and how much medicine you needed during past emergency department visits to decide how much medicine to give you. This is called patient specific treatment.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Aug 2019

open study

Blood Donor CVD 5000
University of Maryland, Baltimore Risk Reduction
This is an open-label, non-randomized study. Volunteers will be vaccinated with the typhoid oral vaccine, Vivotif. Vivotif has been licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for travelers to developing countries. Volunteers will also be asked to provide blood, saliva,... expand

This is an open-label, non-randomized study. Volunteers will be vaccinated with the typhoid oral vaccine, Vivotif. Vivotif has been licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for travelers to developing countries. Volunteers will also be asked to provide blood, saliva, and stool specimens over a follow-up time period of up to eight years. The specimens obtained in this clinical research study will be used to further the investigator's understanding of the protective immunological mechanisms that can be elicited systemically and may be applicable to other enteric pathogens.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Jan 2004

open study

Phase 3 Study of Reltecimod vs Placebo in Patients With Sepsis-associated Acute Kidney Injury
Atox Bio Ltd Acute Kidney Injury Peritonitis Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection
Phase 3 multicenter study to be conducted in up to 90 qualified participating sites globally to assess the efficacy and safety of Reltecimod vs placebo in patients with sepsis-associated Stage 2/3 AKI. expand

Phase 3 multicenter study to be conducted in up to 90 qualified participating sites globally to assess the efficacy and safety of Reltecimod vs placebo in patients with sepsis-associated Stage 2/3 AKI.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: May 2018

open study

Treatment of Chronic Antibody-mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant With Acthar
University of Maryland, Baltimore Transplant Glomerulopathy
This is an open label safety and feasibility trial using Acthar® in addition to the investigators center-specific standard therapy, which could include increase in maintenance immunosuppression, high dose IVIG (2 g/Kg), and/or Rituximab, in patients with CAMR. expand

This is an open label safety and feasibility trial using Acthar® in addition to the investigators center-specific standard therapy, which could include increase in maintenance immunosuppression, high dose IVIG (2 g/Kg), and/or Rituximab, in patients with CAMR.

Type: Interventional

Start Date: Aug 2016

open study